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Access to literacy - Glimpses from two different parts of the world
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science. (Läsforskning)
2009 (English)In: NERA's 37th Congress, Trondheim, 5-7 March, 2009, 2009Conference paper, (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

To be literate can be defined as being able to develop ones potential and to participate in democracy, thus contributing to society. Literacy and education are closely connected. Historically, children with learning disabilities (LD) have been treated as non-educational and been neglected. By LD we here refer to cognitive disabilities such as mental retardation (MR) or dyslexia. Today, children with dyslexia go to mainstream school but are often submitted to special training outside the classroom. For children with mild MR, special schools were 1954 established by law in Sweden, but not until fourteen years later children with severe MR went to school, special schools as well. In Sweden and even internationally, it seems to be a wide consensus that children with disabilities should be included in a school for all, as reflected in the 1994 Salamanca declaration. However, as we can see in Sweden inclusion is not always the case. An unanswered question is how this affects the children’s access to literacy. We can see a problem if teachers and other professionals from their point of view of man and knowledge put the frameworks around pupil’s possibilities for literacy development. This study will explore and discuss the educational possibilities for some of these children. We have directed the searchlight towards two countries that have adopted the Salamanca declaration, namely Sweden and Argentina.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009.
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-6033OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-6033DiVA: diva2:323438
Conference
NERA's 37th Congress, Trondheim, 5-7 March, 2009
Available from: 2010-06-10 Created: 2010-06-10 Last updated: 2012-12-21Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf