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Age, Policy Changes and Work Orientation: Comparing Changes in Commitment to Paid Work in Four European Countries
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2856-0475
Sociologiska institutionen, Umeå Universitet.
2010 (English)In: Journal of Population Ageing, ISSN 1874-7884, E-ISSN 1874-7876, Vol. 2, no 3-4, 101-120 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Due to ageing populations and a future shortage of labour active people, there is a political ambition to prolong people’s work force activities in Europe. The question of this paper is to what degree policy changes aimed at prolonging people’s working lives have been successful in influencing peoples’ commitment to paid work during the studied period of time? The age patterns of non-financial employment commitment (EC) and organisational Commitment (OC) are examined from the perspective of policy changes in four European countries, using ISSP-data collected in 1997 and 2005 from Denmark, Great Britain, Hungary and Sweden. Because of hypothesised country and group differences in visibility and proximity of policy measures taken to increase labour market participation among older workers, Danish and Swedish people were expected to display some degree of general and intended attitudinal response to the policy changes and that the British and Hungarian response would be more gender divided. The results showed that policy changes overall had little intended effect on people’s attitudes to work. Instead, EC dropped dramatically in Hungary for all men from the age of 30 and over, and for Swedish men and Danish women in the 45-53 age group. OC decreased for Swedish men in the age 54 and over, and for Danish women in the 45-53 age group. The main exceptions were British and Hungarian women that displayed unchanged or even an increase in EC in the age group 54 and over.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer , 2010. Vol. 2, no 3-4, 101-120 p.
Keyword [en]
Ageing population, Age culture, Employment commitment, Organisational commitment, Exit culture, Labour market, Gender, Work orientation
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Work Life Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-7079DOI: 10.1007/s12062-010-9023-3Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-78049422140OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-7079DiVA: diva2:343445
Available from: 2010-08-13 Created: 2010-08-10 Last updated: 2016-09-20Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf