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On "Bad Terms": A Translation and an Analysis of Culture Specific Terms in an Academic Study on Gangsta Rap
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
2010 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

This paper deals with the translation and the analysis of a text on American rapper Tupac Shakur. The analysis focuses on the translation of terms, related to gangsta rap and other culture specific terms. A cultural approach to translation serves as basis as the text is highly culture bound. When dealing with the translation of terms, Vinay and Darbelnet (Munday 2008) and Rune Ingo (Ingo 2007) are the theoretical sources used. When settling on which cultural strategy best applicable for the translation, Anna Trosborg (Trosborg 1997) constitutes the main theoretical source.

The source text was rich in culture specific terms both in relation to gangsta rap and other cultural phenomena specific for the US. For this reason, it proved interesting to analyse these terms more in detail. Although some of the terms are established in English, however in slightly different forms, they have undergone a semantic change when adopted by the rap and hip hop culture. The new meaning of such terms might not be as evident as one might regard them.

It was the terms that posed the biggest challenge during the translation process. The most difficult part was to arrive at what they have come to signify in the rap culture. This was also true for terms related to African American studies as those terms have no equivalent in the target language. However, as the rap culture has reached far beyond the US borders, some terms have become internationalised. This became evident when finding that some of the rap terms were already in use in the target language.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. , p. 25
Keywords [en]
gangsta rap, culture specific, terms, borrowing, equivalence
National Category
Specific Languages
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-8311OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-8311DiVA, id: diva2:349945
Presentation
2010-08-23, 14:50 (English)
Uppsok
Humanities, Theology
Supervisors
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Available from: 2010-10-04 Created: 2010-09-09 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf