lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Humans and fire: Consequences of anthropogenic burning during the past 2 Ka
University of Oregon, USA.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2025-410X
Montana State University, USA.
Show others and affiliations
2010 (English)In: PAGES News, ISSN 1811-1602, E-ISSN 1811-1610, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 80-82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The case studies here illustrate how the timing and consequences of anthropogenic interventions in natural fire regimes vary greatly across space and depend heavily on local ecological context; they also demonstrate why the cumulative

global effects of anthropogenic impacts on fire regimes have been difficult to detect until the past two centuries (Fig. 2). Increasing efforts to synthesize existing paleoecological records (Power et al., 2009), and combine multiproxy evidence of paleoenvironmental changes with archeological data and modeling promise valuable advancements in our understanding of coupled human-natural systems in the past.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 18, no 2, p. 80-82
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Environmental Science, Paleoecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-9987OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-9987DiVA, id: diva2:387633
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilAvailable from: 2011-01-14 Created: 2011-01-14 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Fire history in the hemiboreal and southern boreal zones of southern Sweden during 11000 years: Relationships with past vegetation composition and human activities and implications for biodiversity issues
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fire history in the hemiboreal and southern boreal zones of southern Sweden during 11000 years: Relationships with past vegetation composition and human activities and implications for biodiversity issues
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis studies fire history over the last 11 000 years (Holocene) in central Småland, southern Sweden, on the basis of palaeoecological analyses of peat sequences from three small bogs (Notteryd, Stavsåkra and Storasjö). The main objective is to gain insights into the long-term relationships between fire, climate, human-impact, other environmental factors and the history of biodiversity in the study region. The following hypotheses are tested: 1) there are no between-site differences in i) Holocene fire history, ii) abundance of deciduous trees versus pine and forest openness over the Holocene, and iii) landscape history over the last three centuries, and 2) there are no within-site differences in the Holocene charcoal records.

Hypothesis 1 (i-iii) is tested using all charcoal records (three sites) and pollen-based Landscape Reconstruction Algorithm (LRA) estimates of past percentage cover of plant taxa and land-use/vegetation units over the last three centuries (test of the LRA using historical maps), and the entire Holocene. Hypothesis 2 is tested using two parallel charcoal records from the same core at Notteryd. The charcoal data comprise continuous records of macroscopic charcoal (macro-C), microscopic charcoal records from pollen slides, and identification of charcoal fragments to plant taxa. Chronologies are based on series of 14C dates from terrestrial plant remains and age-depth models achieved using Bayesian statistics.

Accumulation rates (AR) of the area of macro-C was found to be better to use than AR of the number of macro-C for interpretation of the results. Within-site differences in charcoal records exist and have to be considered. Besides climate, forest tree-composition (related to geomorphological settings) was shown to play a primordial role in Early and Mid-Holocene fire history, while land-use was a major factor in the Late Holocene. Three different histories of forest development and land-use changes within the same region are revealed, implying a multitude of landscape types over time and space. These long-term landscape histories were at the origin of the high biodiversity still existing in the 18th century. Major landscape transformations due to agrarian reforms since the 18th century resulted in a dramatic loss of landscape and species biodiversity over the last two centuries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Växjö: Linnaeus University Press, 2013
Series
Linnaeus University Dissertations ; 155/2013
Keywords
Fire history, land-use history, biodiversity, charcoal analysis, Landscape Reconstruction Algorithm (LRA), Holocene, Småland, Sweden
National Category
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Research subject
Environmental Science, Paleoecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-30154 (URN)978-91-87427-62-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2013-12-05, B135, Fullriggaren, Barlastgatan 11, Kalmar, Kalmar, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2013-11-10 Created: 2013-11-06 Last updated: 2013-11-10Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Fulltext

Authority records BETA

Cui, Qiao-YuGaillard, Marie-José

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Cui, Qiao-YuGaillard, Marie-José
By organisation
School of Natural Sciences
In the same journal
PAGES News
Ecology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 225 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf