lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Life cycle primary energy analysis of residential buildings
Mittuniversitetet, Institutionen för teknik och hållbar utveckling. (Ecotechnology)
Mittuniversitetet, Institutionen för teknik och hållbar utveckling. (Ecotechnology)
2010 (English)In: Energy and Buildings, ISSN 0378-7788, E-ISSN 1872-6178, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 210-220Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The space heating demand of residential buildings can be decreased by improved insulation, reduced air leakage and by heat recovery from ventilation air. However, these measures result in an increased use of materials. As the energy for building operation decreases, the relative importance of the energy used in the production phase increases and influences optimization aimed at minimizing the Life cycle energy use. The Life cycle primary energy use of buildings also depends on the energy supply systems. In this work we analyse primary energy use and CO2 emission for the production and operation of conventional and low-energy residential buildings. Different types of energy supply systems are included in the analysis. We show that for a conventional and a low-energy building the primary energy use for production can be up to 45% and 60%, respectively, of the total, depending on the energy supply system, and with larger variations for conventional buildings. The primary energy used and the CO2 emission resulting from production are lower for wood-framed constructions than for concrete-framed constructions. The primary energy use and the CO2 emission depend strongly on the energy supply, for both conventional and low-energy buildings. For example, a single-family house from the 1970s heated with biomass-based district heating with cogeneration has 70% lower operational primary energy use than if heated with fuel-based electricity. The specific primary energy use with district heating was 40% lower than that of an electrically heated passive row house.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 42, no 2, p. 210-220
Keyword [en]
Residential, passive, low-energy, district heating, cogeneration, supply, electricity
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Civil engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-15606DOI: 10.1016/j.enbuild.2009.08.017ISI: 000273837400008Scopus ID: 71649086165OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-15606DiVA, id: diva2:455057
Available from: 2008-12-29 Created: 2011-11-08 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Gustavsson, Leif

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Gustavsson, Leif
In the same journal
Energy and Buildings
Other Environmental Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 132 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf