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Patient and staff perceptions of the ward atmosphere in a Swedish maximum-security forensic psychiatric hospital
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3164-8681
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5719-7102
2005 (English)In: Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology, ISSN 1478-9949, E-ISSN 1478-9957, Vol. 16, no 2, 263-276 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The main aim of the study was to describe and compare the patient and staff perceptions of the ward atmosphere of a maximum-security forensic psychiatric hospital in southern Sweden. The main instrument used, the Ward Atmosphere Scale (WAS), was administered to both patients and staff on the eight wards of the hospital, where there was a total of 82 beds. The hospital has a regional responsibility for maximum-security forensic psychiatric care in southern Sweden. Forty-eight per cent of the patients and 82% of the staff consented to participate in the study. The results of the study showed that the patients rated intermediate levels of all the 10 subscales of WAS with the lowest mean scores for Autonomy and Involvement and the highest mean scores for Programme Clarity and Order and Organization. The staff, however, rated a low level of Staff Control and high levels of Programme Clarity, Practical Orientation and Support. The staff and patient perceptions differed on eight of the 10 WAS subscales with only Personal Problem Orientation and Anger and Aggression being rated at similar levels. The results are considered in the light of the limited available literature in the field. Furthermore, the differences between the perceptions of the two groups as well as the clinical implications of these differences are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group , 2005. Vol. 16, no 2, 263-276 p.
Keyword [en]
forensic psychiatry, ward atmosphere, patient perceptions, staff perceptions, clinical implications
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-15776DOI: 10.1080/1478994042000270238OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-15776DiVA: diva2:455829
Available from: 2011-11-11 Created: 2011-11-11 Last updated: 2017-03-14Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf