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Introducing the nature of school science (NOSS)
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science. (Värdepedagogik)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4072-2986
2010 (English)In: Contemporary Science Education Research: SCIENTIFIC LITERACY AND SOCIAL ASPECTS OF SCIENCE: A collection of papers presented at ESERA 2009 Conference / [ed] G. ÇAKMAKCI & M. F. TAŞAR, Turkey: ESERA , 2010, 281-286 p.Conference paper, (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper focuses on how students and teachers address features of science in school science practice in lower secondary school. The pointof departure is that if a school subject content is treated as relevant, it is likely to promote the involvement of the students. The conceptnature of science (NOS) could be part of science education and perhaps enhance the relevance of a school science activity. The excerptsfound in this text are based on video observations in two schools. The classes were not chosen for any particular reason, except that theteachers and their students agreed to be visited during their lessons. The analysis is based on the idea that school science involves differentways of meaning making and these are referred to as different language games. The analysis points out that school science involves featuresthat are not related to science itself, for example, students’ learning as well as their safety. The science classroom is consequently not anexample of a pure science language game but should be interpreted as a school science language game where students’ learning is a majorpurpose. Features of a school science language game that do not relate to the NOS, but, to students’ learning, I designate nature of schoolscience (NOSS) (Cf. Lundin, 2008). NOSS is not applicable in professional science practices. In a school science language game, theteacher needs to consider the students’ learning, their safety (cf. Lundin & Lindahl, 2005), and to ensure that the lesson is carried out inits allotted time etc. Such considerations are core elements in the NOSS. It is suggested that students’ discrimination of features referringto the NOSS and the NOS could facilitate classroom communication.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Turkey: ESERA , 2010. 281-286 p.
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-15917ISBN: 9786053640332 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-15917DiVA: diva2:460955
Conference
European Science Education Research Association, ESERA. 31 aug-4 sept 2009
Note

Reference: Lundin, M. (2010). INTRODUCING THE NATURE OF SCHOOL SCIENCE (NOSS) Using Wittgenstein’s language game concept to analyse meaning making in school science. In G. Cakmakci & M.F. Taşar (Eds.), Contemporary science education research: learning and assessment (pp. 281–286). Ankara, Turkey: Pegem Akademi.

Available from: 2011-12-05 Created: 2011-12-01 Last updated: 2016-01-26Bibliographically approved

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http://www.esera2009.org/books/Book_5.pdf

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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