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How to handle the Idols of Man?: folk theories and scientific knowledge
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0928-4308
2011 (English)In: ECER 2011, Urban Education: Network: 17. Histories of Education, 2011Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this article is to highlight a number of professional situations in which we have to be aware of our folk-theories and the tendency of idolisation. Bacon (1620) speaks of four classes of Idols which besets human minds; false notions that have deep roots in man and her understanding of the world. A parallel is drawn between idols and folk-theories, the later picked up from popular culture and used in our daily efforts to make sense of events and actions. Both have the same origin as inborn dispositions and are developed trough culture and language. The use of folk-theories is however not, as Bacon argues regarding Idols, discussed in terms of extermination or combat. Folk-theories are a part of our existence and serve us quite well. So what is then the problem? The use of folk-theories is inappropriate when they turn in to Idols used in wrong contexts. Focus is on contexts were professionals have to handle lots of information, and therefore mostly are obliged to folk-theoretical thinking. Lipskys concept “street-level bureaucrats” capture parts of this phenomenon, including a broad spectrum of civil positions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011.
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Pedagogics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-16165OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-16165DiVA: diva2:465713
Conference
ECER 2011, 12-16 September, Berlin
Available from: 2011-12-15 Created: 2011-12-15 Last updated: 2017-01-10Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
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  • vancouver
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Language
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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