lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Beliefs about health and illness in Swedish and African-born women with gestational diabetes living in Sweden.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences. (SHV - Tidigare AMER)
Department of Endocrinology, Malmö University hospital, Lund University.
Department of Endocrinology, Malmö University hospital, Lund university.
2012 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 9-10, p. 1374-1386Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims.  Exploring beliefs about health and illness in women with gestational diabetes born in Sweden and Africa living in Sweden. Further , to study the influence of beliefs on self-care and care seeking. Design: Exploratory descriptive study. Methods.  Semi-structured interviews. Consecutive sample of women diagnosed with gestational diabetes, 13 born in Sweden and 10 born in Africa, from a diabetes clinic in Sweden. Qualitative content analysis of data was applied. Results.  Beliefs were mainly related to individual and social factors. Health was described as freedom from disease and being healthy. Swedish women perceived heredity and hormonal changes as causing gestational diabetes, avoided work-related stress, had a healthy lifestyle, worried about the baby's health and development of type 2 diabetes, sought information, used more medications and health care and were on sick-leave more often because of pregnancy-related problems than African women, who did not know the cause of gestational diabetes, had a passive self-care attitude and followed prescriptions, often reported being told by staff that gestational diabetes would disappear after delivery and stated more pregnancy-related problems which they treated with rest or watchful waiting. Conclusions.  Health/illness beliefs differed and affected self-care and care seeking. Relevance to clinical practice.  Individual beliefs and risk awareness must be elicited, and adequate information must be given to prevent negative health effects of gestational diabetes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2012. Vol. 21, no 9-10, p. 1374-1386
Keywords [en]
Migrants, beliefs about health/illness, Africa, self-care.
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-16216DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2011.03834.xScopus ID: 2-s2.0-84859775354OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-16216DiVA, id: diva2:466988
Available from: 2011-12-18 Created: 2011-12-18 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Hjelm, Katarina

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hjelm, Katarina
By organisation
School of Health and Caring Sciences
In the same journal
Journal of Clinical Nursing
Endocrinology and DiabetesNursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 34 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf