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Effect of weathering on abundance and release of potentially toxic elements in soils developed on Lower Cambrian black shales, P. R. China
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0635-3718
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
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2012 (English)In: Environmental Geochemistry and Health, ISSN 0269-4042, E-ISSN 1573-2983, Vol. 34, no 3, 375-390 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper examines the geochemical features of 8 soil profiles developed on metalliferous black shales distributed in the central parts of the South China black shale horizon. The concentrations of 21 trace elements and 8 major elements were determined using ICP-MS and XRF, respectively, and weathering intensity (W) was calculated according to a new technique recently proposed in the literature. The data showed that the black shale soils inherited a heterogeneous geochemical character from their parent materials. A partial least square regression model and EFbedrock (enrichment factor normalized to underlying bedrock) indicated that W was not a major control in the redistribution of trace metals. Barium, Sn, Cu, V, and U tended to be leached in the upper soil horizons and trapped by Al and Fe oxides, whereas Sb, Cd, and Mo with negative EF values across the whole profiles may have been leached out during the first stage of pedogenesis (mainly weathering of black shale). Compared with the Chinese average soils, the soils were strongly enriched in the potentially toxic metals Mo, Cd, Sb, Sn, U, V, Cu, and Ba, among which the 5 first listed were enriched to the highest degrees. Elevated concentrations of these toxic metals can have a long-term negative effect on human health, in particular, the soils in mining areas dominated by strongly acidic conditions. As a whole, the black shale soils have much in common with acid sulfate soils. Therefore, black shale soils together with acid sulfate soils deserve more attention in the context of metal exposure and human health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2012. Vol. 34, no 3, 375-390 p.
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-16665DOI: 10.1007/s10653-011-9398-yOAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-16665DiVA: diva2:474249
Available from: 2012-01-09 Created: 2012-01-09 Last updated: 2016-11-18Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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