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Parietal lobe activation in rapid, automatized naming by adults.
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2002 (English)In: Perceptual and Motor Skills, ISSN 0031-5125, Vol. 94, no 3 Pt 2, 1230-44 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Three automatic naming tasks (Wiig & Nielsen, 1999) were administered to 60 normally functioning adults. The mean time required for naming 40 single-dimension (colors, forms, numbers, and letters) and 40 dual-dimension stimuli (color-form, color-number, and color-letter combinations) were compared in young (17-38 yr.) and older (40-68 yr.) men and women. Analysis of variance for the combined groups indicated significant naming-time differences for age but not for sex. There were no significant interaction effects. For men there was a significant naming time difference between age groups for forms, and for women for colors and forms. The sex-specific analyses indicated no significant differences in naming time based on age groups for color-form, color-number, or color-letter combinations. In a second study of adult subjects (n = 14), functional brain activity was measured with regional cerebral blood flow during the performance of the color, form, and color-form naming tasks. One subject was repeatedly measured during the performance of each task, whereas 13 subjects were measured during the performance of color-form naming. In comparison to normal reference values for rest and FAS verbal fluency, blood-flow measurements showed a consistent parietal-lobe activation during form and color-form naming, but only a slight activation during color naming. During all naming tasks, a significant frontal and frontotemporal flow decrease was seen in comparison to both rest and verbal fluency reference values. This functional brain activation pattern of a parietal increase and a frontotemporal decrease was consistently confirmed across subjects during the color-form naming task.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. Vol. 94, no 3 Pt 2, 1230-44 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-17568PubMedID: 12186245OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-17568DiVA: diva2:503380
Available from: 2012-02-15 Created: 2012-02-14 Last updated: 2012-12-20Bibliographically approved

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Warkentin, Siegbert
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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf