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Species traits predict island occupancy in noctuid moths
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6398-1617
2012 (English)In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 155-163Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Knowing how species’ traits relate to processes that underlie occupancy patterns such as colonisation and population persistence, is important for our understanding of how species survive in fragmented and changing landscapes. We used automatic UV light-traps to sample noctuidmoths on two remote islands, and compared traits of island occupants with those of a species pool from mainland southeast Sweden. Widely distributed species, generalist species, species with a long adult activity period and species active late in the summer had higher probability of occupancy on the remote islands. The results were consistent between islands. The traits of host plant specificity and species with an adult activity period during late summer remained robust and were statistically significant after controlling for any possible phylogenetic bias. This indicates that species exhibiting those traits survive better when habitat and climate changes. It is crucial to includeour results in; (1) conservation planning, e.g. when devising conservation measures in fragmented landscapes; (2) for predictions of future occupancy patterns; and (3) ecosystem impact assessments, e.g. the importance of moths as pollinators, herbivores and being the functional link between parasitoids, plants, consumers and predators.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2012. Vol. 16, no 2, p. 155-163
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Ecology, Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-18079DOI: 10.1007/s10841-011-9401-zISI: 000301588900001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84858151090OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-18079DiVA, id: diva2:511539
Available from: 2012-03-22 Created: 2012-03-22 Last updated: 2018-05-17Bibliographically approved

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Franzén, MarkusBetzholtz, Per-Eric

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