lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Adjustment of brood care behaviour in the absence of a mate in two species of Nicaraguan crater lake cichlids
University of Konstanz, Germany ; Monash University, Australia; University of Turku, Finland.
Monash University, Australia.
Monash University, Australia.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1426-0036
University of Konstanz, Germany.
2011 (English)In: Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, ISSN 0340-5443, E-ISSN 1432-0762, Vol. 65, no 4, 613-619 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In many taxa, parental strategies can vary among individuals. This is especially true in species with biparental care, with males, more often than females, deserting their mates. While there is an abundance of theoretical predictions and empirical data on factors inducing mate abandonment by males, much less is known about what consequences this may have on female behaviour, particularly in the field and in non-avian systems. Here, we compared brood defence rate, behavioural defence types, and brood success of solitary and paired females in two species of Neotropical cichlid fish in their natural habitat. In terms of the rate of territorial aggression towards potential brood predators, solitary females were able to fully compensate in the absence of a male but, in so doing, ended up maintaining smaller territories, which appeared to compromise offspring fitness in at least one of the two species. Hence, our results suggest that even extensive quantitative compensation in parental effort by solitary females may not be enough to ensure adequate qualitative compensation for the lack of male participation, highlighting the importance of distinguishing between these two aspects of compensatory parental care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 65, no 4, 613-619 p.
Keyword [en]
Mate desertion, Midas cichlid species complex, Offspring survival, Parental care, Qualitative care compensation, Territorial aggression
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Zoology Behavioral Sciences Biology Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology; Ecology, Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-18777DOI: 10.1007/s00265-010-1062-5OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-18777DiVA: diva2:527821
Available from: 2012-05-22 Created: 2012-05-22 Last updated: 2016-05-26Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Svensson, P. Andreas
In the same journal
Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Evolutionary BiologyZoologyBehavioral Sciences BiologyEcology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 78 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf