lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Guilt and shame: a semantic concept analysis of two concepts related to palliative care
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0017-5188
Gjovik University College, Gjovik, Norway.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3164-8681
2012 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 26, no 4, 787-795 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

The theoretical viewpoint of the study was based on the fundamental motive in caring science; the suffering person and his/her health and life situation, which according to the philosophy of palliative care also includes the next-of-kin. The latter often wish to participate in the care of their loved ones and it is thus important for them to be able to make decisions that can generate a meaningful participation. Unfulfilled obligations or wrong decisions, concerning their dying relative, can result in experiences of guilt and shame in relation to the care of the loved one. A semantic concept analysis can provide a deeper understanding of these concepts and create a deeper insight into what the concepts mean for the individual.

 

Aim

The aim of the study was to elucidate the meaning of and the distinction between the concepts of guilt and shame.

 

Methods

Semantic concept analysis based on Koort and Eriksson.

 

Findings

The findings show that guilt and shame are two separate concepts. Guilt contains meaning dimensions of being the cause of and sin. Shame contains meaning dimensions of something that gives rise to shame and ability to experience shame. The synonyms for each concept do not overlap each other

 

Conclusion

The semantic analysis creates an understanding of the concepts ontologically and provides a basis for theoretical, contextual and clinical understanding and development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2012. Vol. 26, no 4, 787-795 p.
Keyword [en]
semantic concept analysis, guilt, shame, palliative care
National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-23633DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-6712.2012.00992.xPubMedID: 22536856OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-23633DiVA: diva2:593607
Available from: 2013-01-21 Created: 2013-01-21 Last updated: 2017-02-16Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Guilt and shame in end-of-life care: the next-of-kin's perspectives
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Guilt and shame in end-of-life care: the next-of-kin's perspectives
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Aim: The overall aim of the thesis was to explore and describe the concepts of guilt and shame and gain a greater understanding of the next-of-kin’s experiences of guilt and shame in end-of-life care.

Methods: Study I was a qualitative secondary analysis of 47 interviews with next-of-kin searching for experiences of guilt and shame. In study II a semantic concept analysis of the two concepts guilt and shame was performed. In studies III and IV a hermeneutic approach inspired by Gadamer was used to analyze next-of-kin’s experiences of guilt (Study III), and shame (Study IV) in end-of-life care.

Main findings: The concept of guilt focus on behaviour and the concept of shame on the influence on the self.  The situation of being next-of-kin in end-of-life care involves a commitment to make the remaining time for the loved one as good as possible. When, for some reason, the commitment cannot be accomplished there is a risk that the next-of-kin experience guilt such as not having done enough, not having been together during important events, not having talked enough to each other, or not having done the right things. Aspects such as not having fulfilled a commitment, omission, and being the cause of can be present in these experiences. The guilt experience has a focus on what the next-of-kin has, or has not done. The experiences of shame are also linked to a perception that the remaining time for the loved one should be as good as possible. Shame can occur when the next-of-kin is involved and actually causes harm to the loved one as well as in situations that are beyond their control. Shame that the next-of-kin experience can also emanate from being put in situations by other people. Feelings of inferiority and powerlessness, second order shame, and family conflicts that are brought into the open are experiences of shame found in the studies as well as ignominy, humiliation, and disgrace. The shame experience has a focus on the next-of-kin’s self.

Conclusion: The situation of being next-of-kin in end-of-life care is complex and demanding, something that health professionals should be aware of. Acknowledgement of experiences of guilt and shame can help the next-of-kin in their adaptation to the end-of-life situation as a whole and maybe also give useful tools to support next-of-kin during bereavement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Växjö, Kalmar: Linnaeus University Press, 2012. 91 p.
Series
Linnaeus University Dissertations, 106/2012
Keyword
end-of-life care, guilt, hermeneutics, next-of-kin, relatives, secondary analysis, semantic concept analysis, shame
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-23637 (URN)978-91-86983-88-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-12-14, Myrdal, Hus K, Växjö, 10:30 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2013-01-22 Created: 2013-01-21 Last updated: 2016-11-24Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Werkander Harstäde, CarinaRoxberg, ÅsaBrunt, David
By organisation
School of Health and Caring Sciences
In the same journal
Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Other Medical Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 143 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf