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“No children are allowed to come in!” Developing an understanding of external representations for communication
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
2013 (English)In: Presented at The 41st Annual Congress of the Nordic Educational Research Association. Disruptions and eruptions as opportunities for transforming education, Reykjavik, Iceland, March 7-9, 2013, 2013Conference paper, (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Research aim

The aim of this research is to generate knowledge about children’s understanding of external representations and external systems in relation to learning about text. This knowledge is an example of what we could call a “preschool-content” and that could contribute to a didactic knowledge of Swedish preschool.

 

Theoretical framework

The research has 1) a focus on a content of children’s learning, 2) a certain way of understanding learning, and 3) a certain way of bringing about and studying children’s learning in different aspects of the world around them. The basis of the theoretical orientation is a variation theory (Marton & Booth, 1997).

 

Research design

An empirical case study of young children, with focus on one child who is 4 years old, is reported. The child’s spontaneous activity of producing and handling signs in the home is the starting-point of the study. I have arranged situations where the learning object is to discern the communicative function of signs. For the children it implies, for example, to discern the meanings of the sign ‘x’ as a part of a greater whole.  That means the sign is understood as a symbol of something that is forbidden. There are (just for one of the children) nearly four hours video recorded conversations and other forms of documentation like letters, cards, maps and so on.  

Expected findings

The findings indicate the difficulties in understanding the signs as a symbol that has a representational meaning as such.  What to discern and to learn depends of how the researcher uses variation. To be able to discern and to learn a general principle of the sign and how to use this knowledge in a new situation the signs has to vary. In the next part of the research the results are used in preschool with children 4-5 years old and their teachers.

 

Relevance for Nordic Educational research

An important subject in the Nordic countries in relation to the changes in the curricula’s as well as in education of preschool teachers is how content like the communicative function of symbols can be handled in preschool education.

 

 

 

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013.
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-24920OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-24920DiVA: diva2:613174
Conference
The 41st Annual Congress of the Nordic Educational Research Association. Disruptions and eruptions as opportunities for transforming education, Reykjavik, Iceland, March 7-9, 2013
Available from: 2013-03-26 Created: 2013-03-26 Last updated: 2017-03-14Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
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Output format
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