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Intertextuality in academic and non-academic texts: What are the sources and outcomes for EAP writers?
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5299-8982
Stockholm University.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8301-3960
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Intertextuality in its broadest sense—the relationship between two texts—is a pervasive feature of academic writing, as manifested by features such as citations to earlier texts and the sets of features such as structure and organisation which are shared by texts in a given genre and/or academic discipline.

 

Many of the intertextual features of academic writing, such as the choice of reporting verb and verb form, have been thoroughly researched and described (e.g., Charles, 2006; Shaw, 1992). Much is also know about a specific, highly problematic form of intertextuality: plagiarism (e.g., Pecorari & Shaw, 2012). However, less attention has been given to the ways in which novice academic writers become aware of conventional intertextual practices, and less still to the transferability of this feature to writing in the workplace.

 

This paper will present the results of a corpus-based investigation of intertextuality in two domains: the leisure-time reading which lower-division undergraduates do, and a common workplace genre.  By triangulating the results from these two corpora with existing findings about the intertextual features of academic texts it will be possible to describe the extent to which these features overlap with, or diverge from, each other.  This will thus provide an indication of the features which can reasonably be expected to transfer from one domain to another, and which cannot, and should therefore be the subject of explicit instruction in the English for Specific Academic Purposes classroom.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013.
Keyword [en]
English for academic purposes; English for specific purposes; academic writing; second-language writing; business texts; intertextuality
National Category
Languages and Literature General Language Studies and Linguistics
Research subject
Humanities, English; Humanities, Linguistics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-25371OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-25371DiVA: diva2:617043
Conference
BALEAP Biennial Conference, 19-21 April, 2013, Nottingham
Available from: 2013-04-21 Created: 2013-04-21 Last updated: 2017-04-19Bibliographically approved

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Pecorari, DianeShaw, Philip

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf