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Colonialism and Swedish History: Unthinkable Connections?
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. (Concurrences)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6215-6225
2013 (English)In: Scandinavian Colonialism and the Rise of Modernity: Small Time Agents in a Gobal Arena / [ed] Magdalena Naum, Jonas M. Nordin, Springer, 2013, 17-36 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Historian Nils Ahnlund stirred a debate in 1937 by suggesting that Sweden was a weak and deficient coloniser. This outraged his listeners, who viewed seventeenth-century Sweden as a powerful nation. Such fault lines continue to suffuse characterisations of Sweden’s participation in global expansion. Suggesting that Sweden in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries was a colonising power is controversial, but less so today than previously. Recently renewed interest in Sweden’s colonial past and present raises questions of scope and meaning. How have historians interpreted Swedish expansion, what is included, and what is the meaning of the re-evaluation occurring in contemporary scholarship? While often relating Sweden to a Nordic or European context, it remains common to insist on Swedish exceptionalism in terms of colonial experiences and elect not to discuss expansion into the north of the Scandinavian Peninsula or in the Baltic region in terms of colonialism. In general, postcolonial influences have tended to move the discussion from “no colonialism” to “post-colonialism” without ever stopping at a discussion of early modern Swedish involvement in colonial expansion and its consequences. This chapter investigates how Swedish colonial expansion has been dealt with in historical scholarship, but also discusses what historical and contemporary debates reveal about Sweden’s relationship to European modernity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2013. 17-36 p.
National Category
History
Research subject
Humanities, History
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-25427ISBN: 978-1-4614-6201-9 (print)ISBN: 978-1-4614-6202-6 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-25427DiVA: diva2:617950
Available from: 2013-04-25 Created: 2013-04-25 Last updated: 2016-04-28Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf