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Sprouting capacity from intact root systems of Cirsium arvense and Sonchus arvensis decrease in autumn
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Crop Production Ecology.
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Crop Production Ecology.
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Crop Production Ecology.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
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2013 (English)In: Weed research (Print), ISSN 0043-1737, E-ISSN 1365-3180, Vol. 53, no 3, 183-191 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Perennial weeds are often controlled by mechanical means, which aim at stimulating axillary and adventitious buds to sprout. This happens when the apical dominance of the main shoot is removed by defoliation or when the underground system is fragmented. By repeating the measures, the result is a depletion of storage compounds, which weakens the plants and reduces their capacity to grow and reproduce. However, timing is critical. Earlier research has indicated that emergence from fragments of Sonchus arvensis cease during a period in autumn, while the seasonal pattern of sprouting in Cirsium arvense appears to be inconsistent. We studied the emergence pattern of defoliated plants with undisturbed root systems, from late summer to early spring. Potted plants grown outdoors were exhumed at regular intervals, put under forcing conditions for 4weeks, after which shoots above and below soil level were counted and weighed together with the remaining root systems. In both species, the number and weight of emerged shoots decreased during a period in the autumn. In C.arvense, underground shoots were constantly produced during the same period, while fewer underground shoots were present in S.arvensis. For the latter species, apical dominance does not fully explain the effect; thus, endodormancy might be involved. Root weight increased until withering and did not explain the lack of emergence. Our results suggest an impaired sprouting capacity of undisturbed root systems of C.arvense and S.arvensis during SeptemberOctober, which has implications for the timing and method of control of these species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 53, no 3, 183-191 p.
Keyword [en]
creeping thistle, perennial sowthistle, dormancy, vegetative reproduction, mechanical weed control, root growth
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Cell and Organism Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-25582DOI: 10.1111/wre.12013ISI: 000318350500005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84877147683OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-25582DiVA: diva2:620561
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Formas
Available from: 2013-05-08 Created: 2013-05-08 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Hakman, Inger

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