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Effects of land use and climate change on erosion intensity and sediment geochemistry at Lake Lehmilampi, Finland
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. (Palaeoecology)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2025-410X
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
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2013 (English)In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 23, no 9, 1247-1259 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper aims to evaluate the possible relationships between erosion intensity and changes in climate and land use during the past 5.5 cal. k years at Lake Lehmilampi, eastern Finland. In this study we compare a detailed geochemical sediment record with (1) forest and land use history inferred from the first pollen and charcoal records from Lake Lehmilampi, and (2) existing archaeological surveys and independent proxy-records of climate change in the study region. The physical and geochemical sediment parameters examined include grain size analysis data and 23 chemical elements, determined with four selective extractions and ICP-MS. There are indications of possible human impact in the lake catchment as early as the Neolithic period, c. 3000-2550 bc, but the first undisputable signs are dated to 1800-100 bc. Cereal pollen reappears at c. ad 1700 and increases rapidly until c. ad 1950. The Holocene Thermal Maximum, its end c. 2000 bc, and the Medieval Climate Anomaly' were major climate events that had a prominent effect on erosion intensity, while human impact was a more significant factor during the period 3000 bc-ad 800 and from ad 1500 onwards. Although signs of changes in erosion intensity found in the sediment were small in this small catchment, they were significant enough to have a clear impact on the fraction of potentially mobile element species. This fraction increases with decreasing erosion intensity, which is probably related to a higher degree of chemical weathering and leaching during periods of decreased erosion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 23, no 9, 1247-1259 p.
National Category
Geochemistry
Research subject
Environmental Science, Environmental Chemistry
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URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-25585DOI: 10.1177/0959683613484615ISI: 000325711000004Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84881569710OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-25585DiVA: diva2:620648
Available from: 2013-05-09 Created: 2013-05-09 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Augustsson, AnnaGaillard, Marie-JoséPeltola, PasiBergbäck, Bo

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