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A systemic review of shipboard SCR installations in practice
Chalmers tekniska högskola. (Maritime Operations)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2942-1584
Chalmers tekniska högskola. (Maritime Operations)
2013 (English)In: WMU Journal of Maritime Affairs (JoMA), ISSN 1651-436X, Vol. 12, no 1, 63-85 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Growing customer demands and more stringent regulations to reduce harmful air emissions from ships have resulted in an increased interest for the installation of shipboard abatement technologies. Specifically, the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) was early adopted by several Swedish shipping companies. The potential NOx reduction efficiency of the SCR is well established, but the practical experiences of shipboard installations have been less documented. This paper reviews from a systems perspective the practical experiences of marine SCR installations in Swedish shipping. The aim is to identify important not only technical but also human and organizational conditions necessary for safe, efficient, and sustainable SCR operations at sea. Further, to investigate to what extent the capabilities and limitations of human operators and maintainers are taken into account in the design and installation phase of the systems. Two focus group interviews (n010) and five individual interviews were held with relevant stakeholders in the industry, following a semi-structured schedule on the themes installation, operation, maintenance, and training. The results show that deficiencies in the overall system design—with a combination of technical issues, maintenance access problems, and untrained operators with inadequate understanding of the SCR process—have led to inefficient, costly, and unsafe operations. It is concluded that installations and operations of marine SCR systems, and possibly other forthcoming abatement technologies, would benefit from the use of traditional ergonomic principles and methods. This would in turn contribute towards increased sustainability and a reduced environmental impact from shipping.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 12, no 1, 63-85 p.
Keyword [en]
Human–machine system, Human element, Selective catalytic reduction, Revised MARPOL Annex VI, NOx
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics Chemical Process Engineering
Research subject
Shipping, Maritime Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-26092DOI: 10.1007/s13437-012-0034-1OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-26092DiVA: diva2:625734
Available from: 2013-06-05 Created: 2013-06-05 Last updated: 2015-05-26Bibliographically approved

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Österman, Cecilia
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf