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Diversity of Avian Coronaviruses in Mallards Anas platyrhynchos, Ottenby, Sweden
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
2013 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Coronavirus are single-stranded plus-strand RNA viruses that cause several respiratory and neurological diseases in a wide range of animals and humans. There are 4 main groups of Coronaviruses: alpha, beta, gamma and deltacoronavirus, where gamma and deltacoronaviruses have been found in wild birds. This study evaluated the epidemiology and phylogeny of coronavirus in Swedish waterfowl in order to increase the existing knowledge of these viruses in nature. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene of 36 different samples from Mallards collected from Ottenby Bird Observatory, Sweden (56°12’58”N 16°24’40”E) in 2011 were sequenced. These sequences were characterized and compared to other gammacoronaviruses using a phylogenetic approach. Analysis revealed that there is diversity of sequences from the samples as there was evidence of at least 4 groups of RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase sequences. A difference of sequences over time was also detected which might suggest virus turnover due to host herd immunity. However, the results doesn´t demonstrate a clear pattern of reinfection with the same or different RNA-dependent RNA sequences within individuals over time. This study has contributed 1/3 of all gammacoronavirus sequences, and demonstrates the need in finding a method to complete genome sequence these viruses. Comparative genomic studies are important to determine the diversity of virus gene lineages and viral phenotypes, and also to be able to understand the relations behind interclass jumping, which is important to predict and avoid pandemics that coronavirus might cause.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. , 24 p.
Keyword [en]
Avian Coronavirus
National Category
Biomedical Laboratory Science/Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-26753OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-26753DiVA: diva2:630200
External cooperation
Centre for Ecology and Evolution in Microbial Model Systems (EEMiS)
Subject / course
Biomedical Sciences
Educational program
Health Science Programme with Specialisation in Bio Sciences, 180 credits
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2013-07-21 Created: 2013-06-18 Last updated: 2013-07-21Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf