lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Studies on organic liquid baby-food gruel: The effect of including organic flour and starch from corn
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
2013 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Studies conducted on foods aimed for infants and young children have shown that foods containing rice have a high content of arsenic and cadmium. Arsenic and cadmium are toxic elements classified as carcinogens. It is therefore especially important to keep the levels low in foods for infants and young children since they have a high intestinal absorption and since the negative effects become apparent only after many years of chronic exposure.

Aim: The aim of this project was to investigate if the rice flour in baby-food gruel could be replaced with corn flour with the aim to decrease the content of primarily arsenic and cadmium and sustain low levels of lead and mercury while retaining sensory properties. A native corn starch was also evaluated in terms of heavy metal content and sensory properties.

Material & Methods: The rice flour in 4 different recipes was replaced with various proportions of flour and starch from corn whereon sensory evaluations were performed. Stability and viscosity measurements were conducted and the content of arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury was analysed.

Results/Conclusion: No differences in texture and mouth feel could be perceived at low corn flour concentrations when mixed with rice flour. Replacement of 60% of the rice flour fraction with corn flour in a gruel which contained 1.1% rice flour (w/w), may have led to an increased arsenic content. The corn starch provided the highest viscosity and had a smoother mouth feel at the same concentration compared to the corn flour and might be a better choice than the corn flour. In addition, corn starch had a lower content of cadmium and lead compared to the corn flour but further research is needed to establish which one contains the lowest level of arsenic. Both had a lower content of arsenic compared to the rice flour when the flours were analysed separately.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. , 42 p.
Keyword [en]
Gruel, Baby food, Infant food, Heavy metals, Corn flour, Corn starch, Rice flour
Keyword [sv]
Välling, Barnmat, Tungmetaller, Majsmjöl, Majsstärkelse, Rismjöl
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-26969OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-26969DiVA: diva2:631759
External cooperation
Aventure AB
Subject / course
Chemistry
Educational program
Nutrition and Food Science Programme, 180 credits
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2013-08-07 Created: 2013-06-23 Last updated: 2013-08-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Andersson, Fredrik
By organisation
Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences
Chemical Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 236 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf