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Primary energy and carbon dioxide implications of low-energy renovation of a Swedish apartment building
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building and Energy Technology. (SBER)
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building and Energy Technology. (SBER)
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building and Energy Technology. (SBER)
2013 (English)In: Passivhus Norden 2013, 2013, 270-282 p.Conference paper, (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Measures to improve energy efficiency in existing buildings offer a significant opportunity to reduce primary energy use and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The construction of new low energy buildings is important in the long term, but has small effect on the building sector’s overall energy use in the short term, as the rate of addition of new buildings to the building stock is low. In this study we analyse the potential for reducing primary energy use and CO2 emissions in an existing Swedish apartment building with energy efficiency renovation measures. We model changes to a case-study building with an annual final heat energy demand of 94 kWh/m2 to achieve a low-energy building. The modelled changes include improved water taps, windows and doors, increased insulation in attic and exterior walls, electric efficient appliances and installation of a plate heat exchanger in the ventilation system. We analyse the life cycle primary energy and CO2 implications of improving the buildings to a low-energy building. We consider different energy supply systems, including scenarios where the end-use heating technology is resistance heating, electric heat pump or district heating. We find that greater lifecycle primary energy and CO2 reduction are achieved when an electric resistance heated building is renovated than when a district heated building is renovated. Material production primary energy use and CO2 emission become relatively more significant when the operation energy is reduced. However, the increases in material production impacts are strongly offset by greater primary energy and CO2 reductions from the operation phase of the building, resulting in significant lifecycle benefits. Additional roof insulation gives the biggest primary energy efficiency when the building is heated with resistance heating. For electric heat pump or district heating, more electric efficient appliances give the biggest primary energy efficiency. Still the heat supply choice has greater impact on primary energy use and CO2 emissions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. 270-282 p.
Keyword [en]
Renovation; existing building; lifecycle; primary energy; CO2 emission; heat supply systems.
National Category
Building Technologies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-27074OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-27074DiVA: diva2:632541
Conference
Passivhus Norden, October 15-17, Göteborg
Available from: 2013-06-25 Created: 2013-06-25 Last updated: 2015-01-12Bibliographically approved

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Dodoo, AmbroseGustavsson, LeifTettey, Uniben Yao Ayikoe
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Total: 126 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf