lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Skirting Hybridity: Translating Racial Anarchy in Richard Marsh’s The Surprising Husband
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature. (LNUC Concurrences in Postcolonial Studies)
2012 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

As Elaine Showalter, Paul Gilroy, Mary Louise Pratt, and R. C. J. Young have suggested, the late nineteenth century was a time when Englishness was fraught with difference, even in a state of racial and sexual anarchy. This suggests not only that Englishness (or indeed to be “Western”) was a less homogeneous and stable position than assumed by the British at the time. In addition to this, this anarchy and flux led to new hybrid forms of Englishness that transformed British society.

 

This process was recorded by, and is often studied through, literature. Thus, the writings of Oscar Wilde, Bram Stoker, Rudyard Kipling and Joseph Conrad can be perceived as attempts at resolving the constantly changing category of Englishness by either completely rejecting the Other (Stoker), or by finding (arguably failed) ways of including the Other in new forms of Englishness (Kipling, Conrad). However, some writers, such as Richard Marsh, seem to both reject and embrace the possibility of the Other. Thus, this paper seeks to demonstrate how Marsh’s fiction resonates with several concurrent yet conflicting voices through a reading of his gothic melodrama The Surprising Husband (1908). In the novel, which discusses miscegenation in early nineteenth century Britain in surprising ways, Marsh attempts to translate the racial anarchy that was prevalent in his society into a coherent narrative, but the text fails to hybridize on any level. Instead, I argue, Marsh negotiates the racial challenge to Englishness through a heterogeneous but not hybrid text where English and subaltern voices speak simultaneously. Marsh’s text thus maps the rifts that occurred in English society rather than the hybrid states that these rifts eventually produced.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012.
Keyword [en]
Richard Marsh, Eugenics, Transculturation, Racism, Postcolonialism
National Category
Specific Literatures Cultural Studies
Research subject
Humanities, English literature; Humanities, History
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-28068OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-28068DiVA: diva2:640223
Conference
Transculturation and Aesthetics: Third meeting of The Nordic Network of Literary Transculturation Studies, 30 August - 2 September 2012, Bergen
Projects
Concurrences
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2013-08-13 Created: 2013-08-13 Last updated: 2017-03-24Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Authority records BETA

Höglund, Johan

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Höglund, Johan
By organisation
School of Language and Literature
Specific LiteraturesCultural Studies

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 138 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf