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Treatment of aluminium oxide covered gallium phosphate surfaces for myosin II motor protein adhesion and motility
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
2012 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

With their efficiency and nano-scaled size, cytoskeletal motors propose a promising addition to new technical innovations. These small workhorses are perfected by evolution and work with high proficiency in nanoscale environments. Since they utilize ATP as energy source they are rendered independent of an external power source. This opens up for the development of advanced mobile diagnostic devices that are as easy to use as a home-use pregnancy test. If they could deliver attached cargo molecules uni-directionally to different reaction chambers on lab-on-a-chip devices, they could replace the use of microfluids. This would include using topographically designed nanowire surfaces, such as aluminum oxide. This paper focuses on the design of a non-etching surface treatment for these gallium phosphate surfaces, which yield a high motility while yet being easy to reproduce. A step-by-step experiment was constructed and involves the use of various surface-cleaning and silanization procedures. The surfaces chemistry and morphology was analyzed with contact angle measurements, ellipsometry as well as in vitro motility assays. While a thought to be favorable surface chemistry was successfully attained utilizing 18 M sulphuric acid together with a following silanization using TMCS, a high motility was not. It was speculated that further manipulation of the silanization protocol and its chemicals could yield a more satisfactory result. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. , 30 p.
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-28224OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-28224DiVA: diva2:641259
Subject / course
Chemistry
Educational program
Nutrition and Food Science Programme, 180 credits
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2013-08-19 Created: 2013-08-16 Last updated: 2016-02-22Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
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  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
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Output format
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  • text
  • asciidoc
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