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Library and information science's ontological position in the networked society: using new technology to get back to an old practice
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
2013 (English)In: Information research, ISSN 1368-1613, E-ISSN 1368-1613, Vol. 18, no 3, paper C13- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sheffield, England, 2013. Vol. 18, no 3, paper C13- p.
Keyword [en]
Knowledge organization, information architecture, Artificial intelligence, Extended Mind theory, Luhmann´s systems theory
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Humanities, Library and Information Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-28971ISI: 000329310400022OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-28971DiVA: diva2:649934
Conference
Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Conceptions of Library and Information Science, Copenhagen, Denmark, 19-22 August, 2013
Note

Introduction. This paper concerns the ontological position of library and informations science in the networked society. The aim of the study is to understand library use and library functions in the age of Internet and artificial intelligent programmed search engines.Theoretical approach. The approach discusses so called sociocognitive tools in knowledge sharing and creation by the way social processes are described in Luhmann's systems theory. The capacity in these tools is mainly discussed by using the extended mind theory from cognitive science and theories of distributed and situated learning, which show how tools extend human capacity. The importance of tools as part of human development is also discussed by using theories of cultural evolution.Discussion and conclusions. Artificial intelligence tools in a distributed design have a capacity to independently be a part in social knowledge processes, because these programs are good at finding patterns. In this way they extend the human mind to such an extent that library and information science needs to rework its positions on topics such as relevance and meaning seeking. Practical implications are that libraries need to go back to its roots in the way libraries worked in the era before the information explosion. It was a period when more emphasis was on making the library itself capable to expose a lot of possibilities in the literature through knowledge organisation, and not so much on the librarian as a guide to information searching.

Available from: 2013-09-19 Created: 2013-09-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Kåhre, Peter

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf