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Contesting colonialisms, contested stories: early intrusion in East Timor through Portuguese and Dutch eyes
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. (Postcolonial Forum; Concurrences)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4758-191X
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The initial phase of Portuguese political domination over East Timor, occurring more or less in the seventeenth century, is relatively ill chronicled. The official Goa-based Estado da Índia was not steadily established on Timor until 1702. The Portuguese letters and reports preserved for posterity only present a fragmented picture of the process, and much of the story depends on chronicular texts authored by the Dominican missionaries. Nevertheless, the scattered material at hand has inspired a series of Portuguese historians since the late nineteenth century to produce scholarly syntheses of the early colonial intrusion, most notably Affonso de Castro (1867), Humberto Leitão (1948) and Artur Teodoro de Matos (1974). Thes eaccounts tend to emphasize Portuguese agency, while the interplay with the Dutch East India Company(VOC) and indigenous polities remains comparatively vague. To a large extent this style of historiography is due to the nature of the source material, although the political discourses of pre-1974 Portugal obviously played a role, too. The present study surveys and evaluates the picture of the early colonial phase provided by Portuguese materials, and confronts it with the resources offered by the VOC archives, issued and preserved on a regular basis. The paper discusses how the two colonial funds of knowledge reflect the mutual rivalry of the Estado and the VOC; but also how they can expand our knowledge of early Timorese society when read in concert and thus avoid the image of Timor as merely the arena for competing colonialisms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013.
Keywords [en]
East Timor, Colonialism, VOC, Portugal, Historiography
National Category
History
Research subject
Humanities, History
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-30356OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-30356DiVA, id: diva2:663493
Conference
International Convent of Asia Scholars (ICAS) 8, Macau, 24-27 June, 2013
Projects
Concurrences
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilAvailable from: 2013-11-11 Created: 2013-11-11 Last updated: 2017-02-17Bibliographically approved

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Hägerdal, Hans

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf