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Animals and brand association in advertising
Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
Internationella Handelshögskolan i Jönköping.
Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
2013 (English)In: NFF 2013: On Practice and Knowledge Eruptions. ISSN 2298-3112, Nordic Academy of Management, University of Iceland , 2013Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Advertising fulfils a number of functions for a brand, such as informing, persuading and reminding consumers of the brand. Advertising helps create and sustain brand associations in the mind of the consumer. Selecting the most appropriate symbols for a brand is part of the crea-tion of positive associations. Consumers are active in the creation process when they construct a comprehensive set of brand associations, which help them make infer-ences about the product or service and construct a brand image. A brand association is defined as “anything that is linked in memory to a brand”.We have observed more animals in advertising and assume that the animal is expected to benefit the organi-sation by creating positive brand associations. The pur-pose is to investigate the use of animals in advertising and conceptualize how the animals support the associa-tion process.Recent advertising shown in the Swedish media (dur-ing 2012) which featured animals was identified and analysed. Use was made of an analysis guide for coding purposes. In the advertising, the specific animal, the product (or service or brand), the way in which the ani-mal was shown as well as the specific associations were examined.Preliminary findings suggest that animals are used in a rational way when examining the product category (e.g. dairy products and cows, cat food and cats). But the use of animals can also convey a somewhat subtle mes-sage like the lifestyle of a person portrayed with no direct connection to the functionality of the product (e.g. dogs in advertisements for cars).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nordic Academy of Management, University of Iceland , 2013.
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Economy, Business administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-31170OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-31170DiVA, id: diva2:677992
Conference
22nd Nordic Academy of Management Conference (NFF)"On Practice and Knowledge Eruptions", Reykjavik, Iceland, August 21-23, 2013
Note

The proceedings are available on a USB key. ISSN 2298-3112

Available from: 2013-12-10 Created: 2013-12-10 Last updated: 2015-05-27Bibliographically approved

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Anderson, HelénLund, Kaisa

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf