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Effects of genotypic and phenotypic variation on establishment are important for conservation, invasion and infection biology.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. (Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst EEMiS;Evolutionary ecology)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9598-7618
2014 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 111, no 1, p. 302-307Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is abundant evidence that the probability of successful establishment in novel environments increases with number of individuals in founder groups and with number of repeated introductions. Theory posits that the genotypic and phenotypic variation among individuals should also be important, but few studies have examined whether founder diversity influences establishment independent of propagule pressure, nor whether the effect is model or context dependent. I summarize the results of 18 experimental studies and report on a metaanalysis that provides strong evidence that higher levels of genotypic and phenotypic diversity in founder groups increase establishment success in plants and animals. The effect of diversity is stronger in experiments carried out under natural conditions in the wild than under seminatural or standardized laboratory conditions. The realization that genetic and phenotypic variation is key to successful establishment may improve the outcome of reintroduction and translocation programs used to vitalize or restore declining and extinct populations. Founder diversity may also improve the ability of invasive species to establish and subsequently spread in environments outside of their native community, and enhance the ability of pathogens and parasites to colonize and invade the environment constituted by their hosts. It is argued that exchange of ideas, methodological approaches, and insights of the role of diversity for establishment in different contexts may further our knowledge, vitalize future research, and improve management plans in different disciplines.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 111, no 1, p. 302-307
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Ecology, Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-31366DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1317745111ISI: 000329350700080Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84891942991OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-31366DiVA, id: diva2:683109
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilAvailable from: 2014-01-02 Created: 2014-01-02 Last updated: 2018-10-24Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full textScopushttp://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/12/19/1317745111.abstract

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Forsman, Anders

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