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A 4-year study of avian influenza virus prevalence and subtype diversity in ducks of Newfoundland, Canada.
Mem Univ Newfoundland, Canada.
Mem Univ Newfoundland, Canada. (Zoonotic Ecology and Epidemiology)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5629-0196
Mem Univ Newfoundland, Canada.
Environm Canada, Wildlife Res Div, Canada.
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2013 (English)In: Canadian journal of microbiology (Print), ISSN 0008-4166, E-ISSN 1480-3275, Vol. 59, no 10, p. 701-708Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The island of Newfoundland, Canada, is at the eastern edge of North America and has migratory bird connections with the continental mainland as well as across the North Atlantic Ocean. Here, we report a 4-year avian influenza virus (AIV) epidemiological study in ducks in the St. John's region of Newfoundland. The overall prevalence of AIV detection in ducks during this study was 7.2%, with American Black Ducks contributing the vast majority of the collected samples and the AIV positives. The juvenile ducks showed a significantly higher AIV detection rate (10.6%) compared with adults (3.4%). Seasonally, AIV prevalence rates were higher in the autumn (8.4%), but positives were still detected in the winter (4.6%). Preliminary serology tests showed a high incidence of previous AIV infection (20/38, 52.6%). A total of 43 viruses were characterized for their HA-NA or HA subtypes, which revealed a large diversity of AIV subtypes and little recurrence of subtypes from year to year. Investigation of the movement patterns of ducks in this region showed that it is a largely non-migratory duck population, which may contribute to the observed pattern of high AIV subtype turnover. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 H1N1 and one H5N4 AIVs showed these viruses were highly similar to other low pathogenic AIV sequences from waterfowl in North America and assigned all gene segments into American-avian clades. Notably, the H1N1 viruses, which were identified in consecutive years, possessed homologous genomes. Such detection of homologous AIV genomes across years is rare, but indicates the role of the environmental reservoir in viral perpetuation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 59, no 10, p. 701-708
National Category
Microbiology
Research subject
Natural Science, Microbiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-32949DOI: 10.1139/cjm-2013-0507ISI: 000325548300008PubMedID: 24102224OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-32949DiVA, id: diva2:705608
Available from: 2014-03-17 Created: 2014-03-17 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Wille, Michelle

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