lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Creative Resilience Thinking in Textiles and Fashion
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design. Goldsmiths, University of London, UK.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6920-9871
2015 (English)In: The Handbook of Textile Culture / [ed] Janis Jefferies, Diana Wood Conroy, Hazel Clark, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2015, 1, p. 225-240Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The discourse on environmental improvement of textiles has, in the main, focused on the material realisation of a particular fabric or garment. The fashion industry is increasingly putting strategies into place to achieve cleaner and more efficient processes, and the specifications of CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) work is becoming increasingly standardised. However, our relationship to textiles and fashion – in our roles as designers, makers and users, cannot be reduced to tick-box lists or explained by numbers, and in its rich diversity it defies streamlined models. The activities of designing, creating, crafting, styling, dressing and creating anew, harbour such a wealth of imagination, stored wisdom, complexity of judgement, connectedness – and pure enjoyment. Much of this is tacit knowledge and easily eludes the author of a CSR document. Yet, this chapter argues that these qualities, intrinsic to all textile work (and play), are imperative in the pursuit of truly sustainable textiles and fashion. Many opportunities are missed when all garments are treated alike, without consideration of fashion level or patterns of use. In recent years we have seen how a deep understanding of textiles and fashion can elegantly manifest itself in a series of activities and events: from hacking or customising workshops to knitting circles, from pop-up vintage shops to clothing libraries. Key to the ‘sustainability’ of these phenomena (some in themselves ‘vintage’) is that they shift the emphasis of our relationship with the textile or the garment – and thus with the world – from consuming to participating. Key is also their recognition of the importance of diversity, and their in-tuneness with both the material and symbolic dimensions of the complex fashion system. They work exactly because they embrace the cultures of textiles and fashion, instead of opposing them. This chapter explores how a systemic approach can enrich the detailed development of textiles, and how both material and symbolic notions have a place in resilience thinking. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2015, 1. p. 225-240
Keywords [en]
metadesign, resilience, fashion, textiles, sustainability
National Category
Design
Research subject
Design
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-33462ISBN: 9780857857750 (print)ISBN: 0857857754 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-33462DiVA, id: diva2:709007
Available from: 2014-03-31 Created: 2014-03-31 Last updated: 2018-05-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Contents

Authority records BETA

Tham, Mathilda

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Tham, Mathilda
By organisation
Department of Design
Design

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 669 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf