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Intertextual episodes in lectures: A  classification from the perspective of incidental learning from reading
Stockholm University.
University of Edinburgh.
Chalmers tekniska högskola.
Mälardalen University, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5299-8982
2010 (English)In: Hermes - Journal of Language and Communication Studies, ISSN 0904-1699, E-ISSN 1903-1785, Vol. 45, p. 115-128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In a parallel language environment it is important that teaching takes account of both the languages students areexpected to work in. Lectures in the mother tongue need to offer access to textbooks in English and encouragementto read. This paper describes a preliminary study for an investigation of the extent to which they actually do so.A corpus of lectures in English for mainly L1 English students (from BASE and MICASE) was examined for thetypes of reference to reading which occur, classifi ed by their potential usefulness for access and encouragement. Suchreferences were called ‘intertextual episodes’. Seven preliminary categories of intertextual episode were identifi ed. Insome disciplines the text is the topic of the lecture rather than a medium for information on the topic, and this categorywas not pursued further. In the remaining six the text was a medium for information about the topic. Three of theminvolved management, of texts by the lecturer her/himself, of student writing, or of student reading. The remainingthree involved reference to the content of the text either introducing it to students, reporting its content, or, really themost interesting category, relativizing it and thus potentially encouraging critical reading. Straightforward reportingthat certain content was in the text at a certain point was the most common type, followed by management of studentreading. Relativization was relatively infrequent. The exercise has provided us with categories which can be used for anexperimental phase where the effect of different types of reference can be tested, and for observation of the referencesactually used in L1 lectures in a parallel-language environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 45, p. 115-128
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-33489OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-33489DiVA, id: diva2:709214
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilAvailable from: 2014-03-31 Created: 2014-03-31 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved

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Pecorari, Diane

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf