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Biotin selective polymer nano-films
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. (BBCL ; BMC)
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. (BBCL ; BMC)
Attana AB.
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Nanobiotechnology, ISSN 1477-3155, E-ISSN 1477-3155, Vol. 12, 8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The interaction between biotin and avidin is utilized in a wide range of assay and diagnostic systems. A robust material capable of binding biotin should offer scope in the development of reusable assay materials and biosensor recognition elements. Results: Biotin-selective thin (3-5 nm) films have been fabricated on hexadecanethiol self assembled monolayer (SAM) coated Au/quartz resonators. The films were prepared based upon a molecular imprinting strategy where N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide and 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid were copolymerized and grafted to the SAM-coated surface in the presence of biotin methyl ester using photoinitiation with physisorbed benzophenone. The biotinyl moiety selectivity of the resonators efficiently differentiated biotinylated peptidic or carbohydrate structures from their native counterparts. Conclusions: Molecularly imprinted ultra thin films can be used for the selective recognition of biotinylated structures in a quartz crystal microbalance sensing platform. These films are stable for periods of at least a month. This strategy should prove of interest for use in other sensing and assay systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 12, 8
Keyword [en]
Molecularly imprinted polymer, Biotinylated compounds, Photoinitiated graft co-polymerization, Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensors, Sandwich-casting method
National Category
Organic Chemistry
Research subject
Chemistry, Organic Chemistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-34479DOI: 10.1186/1477-3155-12-8ISI: 000335075000001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-34479DiVA: diva2:720327
Available from: 2014-05-28 Created: 2014-05-28 Last updated: 2017-02-16Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. QCM-based sensing using biological and biomimetic interfaces
Open this publication in new window or tab >>QCM-based sensing using biological and biomimetic interfaces
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The objective of this thesis was to explore novel approaches for studying molecular recognition at biological and biomimetic surfaces using the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor technique. The first two papers focused on the synthesis and study of biotin selective polymer films prepared using the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) technique. Control over polymer structure is of importance for sensor reproducibility and sensitivity, and was addressed in Paper I where a simple strategy for fabricating uniform thin biotin imprinted polymer films was employed. In Paper II the binding of biotin moieties to thin (3-5 nm) biomimetic polymer films was examined and consequences for sensor performance discussed. The potential for using QCM as a tool for assessing the binding of small peptides derived from phage display screening was presented Paper III. Here, screening of a phage peptide library against immobilized adenine resulted in candidate peptides that were studied using this technique. In Paper IV a whole cell-based biosensor was developed for studying interactions with cell membrane-incorporated targets. Epithelial cancer cells, SKOV3, were attached to QCM sensor chips and the binding of the monoclonal antibody HerceptinTM was studied. This approach demonstrates the potential of using QCM to study binding to membrane-incorporated targets, an alternative to assays based upon immobilized receptor structures lacking their natural context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Växjö: Linnaeus University Press, 2014
Series
Linnaeus University Dissertations, 192/2014
Keyword
Quartz crystal microbalance, molecularly imprinted polymers, phage display, interactions, artificial receptors, recognition, selectivity
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-37514 (URN)978-91-87925-20-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-10-31, N2007, Smålandsgatan 26B, Kalmar, 09:30 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2014-10-08 Created: 2014-10-07 Last updated: 2014-10-08Bibliographically approved

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Elmlund, LouiseSuriyanarayanan, SubramanianWiklander, Jesper G.Nicholls, Ian A.
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CiteExportLink to record
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