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Exploration forays in juvenile European hares (Lepus europaeus): dispersal preludes or hunting-induced troubles?
ONCFS, Direct Etud & Rech, F-34990 Juvignac, France.
ONCFS, Direct Etud & Rech, F-34990 Juvignac, France.
ONCFS, F-45370 Dry, France.
Univ Lyon .
2014 (English)In: BMC Ecology, ISSN 1472-6785, Vol. 14, 6- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Movements of animals have important consequences, at both the individual and population levels. Due to its important implications in the evolutionary dynamics of populations, dispersal is one of the most studied types of movement. In contrast, non-permanent extra home-range movements are often paid less attention. However, these movements may occur in response to important biological processes such as mating or predation avoidance. In addition, these forays are often preludes to permanent dispersal, because they may help individuals gain cues about their surroundings prior to settlement in a new place. In the European hare, exploration forays occur predominantly in juveniles, the time at which most hares disperse. In France, the timing of dispersal also overlaps with the hare hunting period. However, the determinants of such behaviour have not yet been studied. Herein, we investigate whether these non-permanent explorations are dispersal attempts/preludes or, in contrast, whether they are triggered by other factors such as disturbances related to hunting. Results: Contrary to natal dispersal, we did not find strong male-bias in the propensity to engage in explorations. Exploration forays occurred less in juveniles than in adults and later in the season than natal dispersal. This was the case both for philopatric movements and for movements occurring after dispersal and settlement. These movements were also more likely to occur during the hare hunting period and the mating season. Conclusions: We suggest that explorations in hares are triggered by factors other than dispersal and that hares may respond to hunting disturbances. Overall, we emphasize the need to account for human-related predation risk as a factor driving space-use in harvested species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 14, 6- p.
Keyword [en]
Predation risk, Extra home-range movements, Telemetry, Dispersal stage, Lagomorphs
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-34482DOI: 10.1186/1472-6785-14-6ISI: 000334940200001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-34482DiVA: diva2:720332
Available from: 2014-05-28 Created: 2014-05-28 Last updated: 2014-05-28Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • text
  • asciidoc
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