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Effect of energy efficiency requirements for residential buildings in Sweden on lifecycle primary energy use
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology. (SBER)
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology. (SBER)
2014 (English)In: Energy Procedia, ISSN 1876-6102, Vol. 61, 1183-1186 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study we analyze the lifecycle primary energy use of a wood-frame apartment building designed to meet the current Swedish building code or passive house criteria, and heated with district heat or bedrock heat pump. We employ a lifecycle perspective methodology and determine the production, operation and end-of-life primary energy use of the buildings. We find that the passive house requirement strongly reduces the final energy use for heating compared to the current Swedish building code. However, the primary energy use is largely determined by the energy supply system, which is generally outside the mandate of the building standards. Overall, buildings with district heating have lower life-cycle primary energy use than alternatives heated with heat pump. The primary energy for production is small relative to that for operation, but it is more significant as the energy-efficiency standard of building improves and when efficient energy supply is used. Our results show the importance of a system-wide lifecycle perspective in reducing primary energy use in the built environment. A life cycle primary energy perspective is needed to minimize overall primary energy use, and future building energy-efficiency standards may reflect the full energy use during a building's life cycle. This could include primary energy implications for production, operation and end-of-life of buildings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 61, 1183-1186 p.
National Category
Engineering and Technology Energy Systems Building Technologies
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-34743DOI: 10.1016/j.egypro.2014.11.1049OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-34743DiVA: diva2:722289
Conference
The 6th International Conference on Applied Energy – ICAE2014. Taipei, May 30- June 2
Available from: 2014-06-06 Created: 2014-06-06 Last updated: 2015-05-12Bibliographically approved

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Dodoo, AmbroseGustavsson, Leif
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf