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The wind is shaking the barley in another part of its fiefdom: A study of the translation of metaphors in the political discourse of the UK media
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
2014 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Metaphors are a common feature of texts, and they fulfil essential referential, stylistic and cognitive functions. These are some of the reasons why they are interesting from a translational viewpoint. An even greater reason is the fact that selecting translation equivalents for metaphors is often all but straightforward, requiring consideration of a wide spectrum of factors. The aim of this thesis is to account for my English to Swedish translations of metaphors found in three political articles in the UK media. The articles were selected mainly because of their abundance of metaphors, but also since metaphors play an especially important role in political discourse. The metaphors were identified by means of the Pragglejaz procedure and divided into lexicalized and non-lexicalized types, and their translations were described by way of Newmark’s typology of translation procedures. The results show that the two metaphor types were translated in a similar way. Replacement by a standard target language (TL) image was the most frequently used procedure, followed by reproduction of the source language (SL) image in the TL, and for the lexicalized type, conversion to sense. The analysis indicates that there is substantial cultural overlap between SL and TL, but also that, when the aim is to produce an idiomatic and communicatively effective target text, literal translation of metaphors is often impossible or not preferable. Because of the multi-faceted nature of metaphors, and since the study is based on a limited material, it is difficult to draw any definite conclusions. However, the thesis can provide some guidance as to the applicability of different translation procedures in English to Swedish translation of metaphors in political texts and show how different factors affect the choice of procedure. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. , p. 33
Keywords [en]
Lexicalized, non-lexicalized, metaphors, political discourse, Pragglejaz, the UK media, translation procedures
National Category
Languages and Literature
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-35287OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-35287DiVA, id: diva2:726215
Subject / course
English
Educational program
Nonfiction Translation Master Programme between English/French/German/Spanish and Swedish, 60 credits
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2014-09-23 Created: 2014-06-17 Last updated: 2014-09-23Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf