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Changes in Medication Preceding Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest Where Resuscitation Was Attempted
University of Gothenburg ; County Hospital Ryhov.
Hudiksvall Hospital.
University of Gothenburg.
University of Gothenburg.
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology, ISSN 0160-2446, E-ISSN 1533-4023, Vol. 63, no 6, 497-503 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To describe recent changes in medication preceding out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) where resuscitation was attempted. Methods: OHCA victims were identified by the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Register and linked by means of their unique 10-digit personal identification numbers to the Prescribed Drug Register. We identified new claimed prescriptions during a 6-month period before the OHCA compared with those claimed in the period 12 to 18 months before. The 7-digit Anatomical Therapeutical Chemical codes of individual drugs were used. The study period was November 2007-January 2011. Results: OHCA victims with drugs were (1) older than those who did not claim any drugs in any period (70 +/- 16 years vs. 54 +/- 22 years, P < 0.001), (2) more often women (34% vs. 20%, P < 0.001), and (3) had more often a presumed cardiac etiology (67% vs. 54%, P < 0.001). The OHCA victims were less likely to have ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation as the first recorded ;rhythm (26% vs. 33%, P < 0.001) or to survive 1 month (9% vs. 17%, P < 0.0001). New prescriptions were claimed by 5122 (71%) of 7243 OHCA victims. The most frequently claimed new drugs were paracetamol (acetaminophen) 10.3%, furosemide 7.8%, and omeprazole 7.6%. Of drugs known or supposed to cause QT prolongation, ciprofloxacin was the most frequent (3.4%) altogether; 16% had a new claimed prescription of a drug included in the "qtdrugs.org" lists. Conclusions: Most OHCA victims had new drugs prescribed within 6 months before the event but most often intended for diseases other than cardiac. No claims can be made as to the causality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 63, no 6, 497-503 p.
Keyword [en]
out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, QT prolongation, medication, torsade de pointes
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Research subject
Biomedical Sciences, Pharmacology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-36090DOI: 10.1097/FJC.0000000000000073ISI: 000337360200003Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84902257272OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-36090DiVA: diva2:734425
Available from: 2014-07-17 Created: 2014-07-17 Last updated: 2016-12-19Bibliographically approved

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Åstrand, Bengt
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Department of Medicine and Optometry
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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Language
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More languages
Output format
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