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An experimental study of combustion and emissions of two types of woody biomass in a 12-MW reciprocating-grate boiler
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
2014 (English)In: Fuel, ISSN 0016-2361, E-ISSN 1873-7153, Vol. 135, 120-129 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The gaseous emissions of primary concern from biomass combustion are nitrogen oxides (NOX), carbon monoxide, and various unburned gaseous components. Detailed characterization of the gas in the hot reaction zones is necessary to study the release, formation, and evolution of the gas components. In the present study, gas temperature and concentration were measured in a 12-MWth biomass-fired reciprocating-grate boiler operated with over-fire air and flue-gas recirculation. Temperature measurement was combined with flue gas quenching and sample gas extraction using two water-cooled stainless-steel suction pyrometers. The concentration profiles of O2, NO, and CO were experimentally determined throughout the furnace, and the profile gas temperature was measured in several positions inside the furnace for the two types of woody biomass studied. For both fuels, the gas temperature varied between approximately 450 °C (average primary chamber temperature) and 1200 °C (average secondary chamber temperature). The concentration profiles of CO and O2 suggested no conclusive difference between the two types of biomass. However, the local mean concentrations of NO and NOX emission factors (measured in the stack) were higher for Greenery fuel due to its higher nitrogen content than that of Standard fuel.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014. Vol. 135, 120-129 p.
Keyword [en]
Combustion
National Category
Energy Engineering
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Bioenergy Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-36117DOI: 10.1016/j.fuel.2014.06.051ISI: 000340945400017OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-36117DiVA: diva2:734437
Available from: 2014-07-17 Created: 2014-07-17 Last updated: 2016-10-11Bibliographically approved

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Sefidari, HamidRazmjoo, NargesStrand, Michael
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf