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Nurses' lived experiences of intensive care unit bed spaces as a place of care: a phenomenological study
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Univ Borås.
Univ Borås, Sweden.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2602-0101
2014 (English)In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 19, no 3, 126-134 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundThe environment of an intensive care unit (ICU) is, in general, stressful and has an impact on quality of care in terms of patient outcomes and safety. Little is known about nurses' experiences, however, from a phenomenological perspective with regard to the critical care settings as a place for the provision of care for the most critically ill patients and their families. AimThe aim of this study was to explore nurses' lived experiences of ICU bed spaces as a place of care for the critically ill. Design and methodsA combination of qualitative lifeworld interviews and photos-photovoice methodology-was used when collecting data. Fourteen nurses from three different ICUs participated. Data were analysed using a phenomenological reflective lifeworld approach. FindingsAn outer spatial dimension and an inner existential dimension constitute ICU bed spaces. Caring here means being uncompromisingly on call and a commitment to promoting recovery and well-being. The meanings of ICU bed spaces as a place of care comprise observing and being observed, a broken promise, cherishing life, ethical predicament and creating a caring atmosphere. Conclusions and relevance to clinical practiceThe architectural design of the ICU has a great impact on nurses' well-being, work satisfaction and the provision of humanistic care. Nurses need to be involved in the process of planning and building new ICU settings. There is a need for further research to highlight the quality of physical environment and its impact on caring practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 19, no 3, 126-134 p.
Keyword [en]
Bed spaces, ICU, Nursing Staff, Phenomenology
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-36098DOI: 10.1111/nicc.12082ISI: 000334425000005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-36098DiVA: diva2:734441
Available from: 2014-07-17 Created: 2014-07-17 Last updated: 2016-11-18Bibliographically approved

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Olausson, SepidehEkebergh, MargarethaAlmerud Österberg, Sofia
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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