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Lifecycle carbon implications of conventional and low-energy multi-storey timber building systems
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology. (SBER)
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology. (SBER)
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology. (SBER)
2014 (English)In: Energy and Buildings, ISSN 0378-7788, Vol. 82, 194-210 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A consequential-based lifecycle approach is used here to explore the carbon implications of conventional and low-energy versions of three timber multi-storey building systems. The building systems are made of massive wood using cross laminated timber (CLT) elements; beam-and-column using glulam and laminated veneer lumber (LVL) elements; and prefabricated modules using light-frame volume elements. The analysis encompasses the entire resource chains during the lifecycle of the buildings, and tracks the flows of carbon from fossil energy, industrial process reactions, changes in carbon stocks in materials, and potential avoided fossil emissions from substitution of fossil energy by woody residues. The results show that the low-energy version of the CLT building gives the lowest lifecycle carbon emission while the conventional version of the beam-and-column building gives the highest lifecycle emission. Compared to the conventional designs, the low-energy designs reduce the total carbon emissions (excluding from tap water heating and household and facility electricity) by 9%, 8% and 9% for the CLT, beam-and-column and modular systems, respectively, for a 50-year lifespan located in Växjö. The relative significance of the construction materials to the fossil carbon emission varies for the different energy-efficiency levels of the buildings, with insulation dominating for the low-energy houses and plasterboard dominating for the conventional houses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014. Vol. 82, 194-210 p.
National Category
Construction Management
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-36618DOI: 10.1016/j.enbuild.2014.06.034ISI: 000343781400020OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-36618DiVA: diva2:740661
Available from: 2014-08-26 Created: 2014-08-26 Last updated: 2017-03-08Bibliographically approved

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Dodoo, AmbroseGustavsson, LeifSathre, Roger
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf