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Towards a flexible energy system - A case study for Inland Norway
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology. Gjovik Univ Coll.
Gjovik Univ Coll.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
2014 (English)In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 130, p. 41-50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper analyze the benefits of the use of bioenergy, solar thermal and wind energy in a flexible energy system to increase the share of renewable sources (RES) in primary energy supply, reduce primary energy consumption (PEC) and ensure power supply security in Inland Norway, and Norway at large. Firstly, the Inland reference energy system was built and validated using the EnergyPLAN system analysis tool based on the year 2009. Two alternative systems (scenarios), mainly of bio-heat and heat pumps in individual and district heating systems were then constructed and compared with the reference system using EnergyPLAN. The quality of a given energy system can be best described by its PEC, RES, emission levels and socio-economic costs. The result shows that it is plausible to improve the quality of the Inland energy system by optimal resource assortment in the energy mix. Integrated use of bin-heat and heat pumps in individual and district heating systems, as a replacement for direct electric heaters would reduce PEC and socio-economic costs considerably more than intensive bio-heating deployment alone, thereby increasing total domestic green electricity generation. The ability to integrate wind power and its value in the Inland energy system is more reflected by reducing imports of electricity during peak demand periods in winter, as wind power availability in the region is significant as opposed to the low precipitation during these periods. In addition, increasing wind energy penetration helps to limit biomass consumption in a district heating system built on heat pumps and bio-heat boilers. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 130, p. 41-50
Keywords [en]
Inland Norway, EnergyPLAN, Heat pump, Direct electric heating, Renewable energy share, Primary energy consumption
National Category
Energy Engineering
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Bioenergy Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-36899DOI: 10.1016/j.apenergy.2014.05.022ISI: 000340311500005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84901937021OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-36899DiVA, id: diva2:746313
Conference
5th International Conference on Applied Energy (ICAE), JUL 01-04, 2013, Pretoria, SOUTH AFRICA
Available from: 2014-09-12 Created: 2014-09-12 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Hagos, Dejene AssefaZethraeus, Björn

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