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Canadian adolescents' perspectives of cancer risk: a qualitative study
University of Manitoba, Canada.
University of Manitoba, Canada.
University of Manitoba, Canada.
2015 (English)In: Health Promotion International, ISSN 0957-4824, E-ISSN 1460-2245, Vol. 30, no 3, 684-694 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research examining adolescents' understandings of cancer and cancer risk is limited. Accordingly, we conducted an ethnographic study that sought to extend our limited understanding of Canadian adolescents' perspectives of cancer and cancer prevention including how adolescents conceptualize and understand cancer risk. This article addresses findings specific to adolescents' perspectives of cancer risk. Seventy-five adolescents (11–19 years old) took part in the study. Two individual open-ended interviews were planned for each adolescent with the second interview occurring 4 to 5 weeks after the first interview. The second interview was complemented by the use of photovoice. Four focus groups, composed of the adolescents who took part in the individual interviews, were also conducted. Data analysis involved both thematic and content analysis. Findings revealed that adolescents conceptualized cancer risk in terms of specific risk factors, with lifestyle factors (e.g., smoking, diet/nutrition and physical inactivity) dominating their discourse. Adolescents rationalized risky health behaviours through use of cognitive strategies that included questioning and evaluating risk information, considering the benefits costs of the cancer risk, and downplaying the impact of the cancer risk. Use of these cognitive strategies helped to make cancer risks more acceptable to adolescents. While adolescents felt that cancer could not always be prevented, they did feel it was possible for individuals to delay getting cancer by lowering the impact of cancer risks through making the right choices. Although more research in this area is needed, the findings from this study may help inform cancer prevention and risk communication programmes and policies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 30, no 3, 684-694 p.
Keyword [en]
adolescent, Canada, children, determinants of health
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-37436DOI: 10.1093/heapro/dau011OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-37436DiVA: diva2:751940
Available from: 2014-10-02 Created: 2014-10-02 Last updated: 2017-04-12Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf