lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Socioeconomic factors and mental health of Swedish adolescents–a cross-sectional study among Stockholm high-school students aged 15–19 years
Karolinska Institutet .
University of Alberta.
University of Alberta.
Seattle University.
2013 (English)In: Vulnerable Children and Youth Studies, ISSN 1745-0128, E-ISSN 1745-0136, Vol. 8, no 2, 120-134 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Adolescence is a period of rapid biological and behavioral changes that may increase the risk of mental health problems. This study investigates the path between self-reported mental health, feeling of alienation, and self-reported physical health by examining the role of demographic factors and socioeconomic variables. Participants were recruited from high schools in Stockholm, Sweden. In total, 445 students participated, aged 15–19 years (SD = 1.01, mean = 17.00); 263 (59.4%) were female and 180 were (40.6%) male. The Nottingham Health Profile and Jessor and Jessor alienation scale were used, and statistical analysis was performed by using regression and path analysis. The results revealed a significant correlation between feeling of alienation and mental health, and found alienation to be a mediating factor between mental health problems and physical health. Female students reported more problems than males. The relationship between neighborhood characteristics (geographical location and type of home) and mental health was also significant. An immigrant background was also found to be one of the important variables for self-reported mental health. The results indicated that having a Swedish mother and father was associated with lower mental health problems, whereas having a father and mother from the Middle East was associated with greater self-reported mental health problems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2013. Vol. 8, no 2, 120-134 p.
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-37438DOI: 10.1080/17450128.2012.708462OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-37438DiVA: diva2:751986
Available from: 2014-10-02 Created: 2014-10-02 Last updated: 2015-03-30Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Safipour, Jalal
In the same journal
Vulnerable Children and Youth Studies
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 24 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf