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Climate effects of bioenergy from forest residues in comparison to fossil energy
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology. (SBER)
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology. (SBER)
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology. (SBER)
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2015 (English)In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 138, 36-50 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Forest residues can be left at the harvest site to gradually decompose, or can be collected for energy purposes. This study analyzes the primary energy and climate impacts of bioenergy systems where forest residues are collected and used for electricity, heat and transportation, compared to fossil-based energy systems where fossil fuels provide the same services while forest residues are left on site to decompose. Time profiles are elaborated of primary energy use and carbon dioxide emissions from various energy applications fulfilled by bioenergy or fossil energy systems. Different biological decay functions are considered based on process-based modeling and inventory data across various climate zones. For all scenarios, the changes in cumulative radiative forcing (CRF) are calculated over a 300-year period, to evaluate the short- and long-term contributions of forest residue to climate change mitigation. A life cycle perspective along the full energy chains is used to evaluate the overall effectiveness of each system. The results show largest primary energy and climate benefits when forest residues are collected and used efficiently for energy services. Using biomass to substitute fossil coal provides greater climate change mitigation benefits than substituting oil or fossil gas. Some bioenergy substitutions result in positive CRF, i.e. increased global warming, during an initial period. This occurs for relatively inefficient bioenergy conversion pathways to substitute less carbon intensive fossil fuels, e.g. biomotor fuel used to replace diesel. More beneficial bioenergy substitutions, such as efficiently replacing coal, result immediately in reduced CRF. Biomass decay rates and transportation distance have less influence on climate benefits.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 138, 36-50 p.
Keyword [en]
forest residues, primary energy, carbon dioxide, radiative forcing, fuel substitution
National Category
Other Environmental Biotechnology
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Bioenergy Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-37493DOI: 10.1016/j.apenergy.2014.10.013ISI: 000347582700005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-37493DiVA: diva2:752744
Note

Errata published in Applied Energy, 2016, vol. 170, pp. 490-493.DOI: 10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.02.087

Available from: 2014-10-06 Created: 2014-10-06 Last updated: 2017-03-08Bibliographically approved

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Gustavsson, LeifHaus, SylviaSathre, RogerTruong, Nguyen Le
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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