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University students' reflections on representations in introductory genetics and stereochemistry
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
Uppsala Universitet.
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Genetics and organic chemistry are areas of science that are regarded as difficult. Part of thisdifficulty is derived from them having representations as part of their disciplinary discourses. Inorder to optimally support students’ learning and meaning-making, teachers need to thoughtfullyuse representations to structure the learning experience in ways that open up the variation instudents’ prior knowledge. For our study, university students’ reasoning on representations ingenetics and organic chemistry was investigated using a focus group approach (8 groups, 4-8students/group). This revealed how students can construct somewhat bewildered relations withdisciplinary-specific representations. For instance, they stated that they preferred familiarrepresentations, but without asserting the meaning-making affordances of those representations.Also, the students were highly aware of the affordances in certain representations, but nonethelesschose not to use those representations in their problem solving. The focus group discussions ledthe students to become more aware of their own and others meaning-making. At the same time,feedback from the students’ focus group discussions enhanced the teacher’s awareness of thestudents’ prior knowledge and meaning-making. Consequently, we posit that a design focus groupmethodology can be fruitfully used both to promote teacher development and progression, andstudent learning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014.
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Science Education
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-37656OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-37656DiVA: diva2:755286
Conference
11th Nordic Research Symposium on Science Education, Helsinki, June 4 – 6, 2014
Available from: 2014-10-14 Created: 2014-10-14 Last updated: 2014-12-11Bibliographically approved

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Edfors, IngerWikman, SusanneJohansson-Cederblad, Brita
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf