lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Protein expression and modifications in denervated atrophic and hypertrophic skeletal muscle
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Skeletal muscle comprises about 45% of the total body weight. It is the largest tissue in the body, vital for maintaining posture, produce locomotion, breathing but also functions as a large reservoir of proteins. Regulation and maintenance of muscle mass is a delicate process and is determined by the balance between protein synthesis and degradation. Following denervation skeletal muscles change their functional and structural properties. Most muscles start to lose weight due to the inactivity caused by denervation and become atrophic, whereas the hemidiaphragm initially increases in weight the first 6-10 days and becomes hypertrophic, followed by a decrease in weight. The aim of this thesis was to examine the expression and phosphorylation of factors potentially involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass in denervated atrophic hind-limb muscles and in denervated hypertrophic hemidiaphragm muscles in mice. Another aim was to identify markers that could be linked to lysosomal and autophagic activities in denervated muscle.Factors of the Akt/mTOR pathway were studied and results indicative of increased protein synthesis were obtained in both denervated atrophic and hypertrophic muscles. This suggests that skeletal muscle atrophy following denervation is more likely to depend on increased protein degradation rather than an overall decrease in protein synthesis (paper I). A differential response of MK2 Thr317 phosphorylation in denervated atrophic and hypertrophic muscles was confirmed, without corresponding changes in phosphorylation of p38, indicating that other factors than p38 are responsible for this differential response, possibly Hsp70. Factors other than MK2 may be responsible for the phosphorylation of Hsp25, since increased levels of phosphorylated Hsp25 were seen in all denervated muscles studied (paper II). Results also suggested FoxO1 and MuRF1 to have potential roles in tissue remodeling that occurs after denervation (paper III). Immunoreactivity for the lysosomal marker Lamp1 and for the autophagic marker protein Lc3 was observed in characteristic ring-like structures in transverse sections of denervated muscle fibers (paper IV).  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Växjö: Linnaeus University Press, 2014. , 162 p.
Series
Linnaeus University Dissertations, 202/2014
Keyword [en]
Skeletal muscle, denervation, atrophy, hypertrophy, protein expression, protein phosphorylation, Akt, p38, MK2, Hsp25, Hsp70, FoxO1, MuRF1, autophagy, Lamp1, Lc3
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-38101ISBN: 9789187925337 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-38101DiVA: diva2:762018
Public defence
2014-12-12, Hörsalen N2007, Västergård, Smålandsgatan 26E, Kalmar, 09:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2014-11-11 Created: 2014-11-10 Last updated: 2014-11-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Evertsson, Kim
By organisation
Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences
Natural Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 289 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf