lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Turn the other chick - religious stereotyping in fundamentalist propaganda comics tracts
Lund University.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7680-9402
2011 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The word "stereotype" generally carries negative connotations; when we hear it we think of bigotry, intolerance, chauvinism, small-mindedness. There are, however, positive stereotypes as well. In some cases stereotypes are even necessary. The medium of comics is a prime example – comics creators often have to use simplified representations to convey an idea or character trait, use stereotypes as a form of cultural “short-hand.” This sometimes leads to regrettable results; the jingoistic superhero comics of World War II, like many from the Cold War era, provide ample examples of this. Will Eisner, in his weekly comic The Spirit from the 1940s, represented the character Ebony in tune with the times; to wit as a big-lipped, bug-eyed, and somewhat dim-witted black youth. An older Eisner, writing in 2003, expressed regret for this treatment. He wrote that he’d realized that there were “good” and “bad” stereotypes – intention, for him, was the key: “Since stereotype is an essential tool in the language of graphic storytelling, it is incumbent on cartoonists to recognize its impact on social judgment.” This presentation will look at how cartoonist and evangelist Jack Chick uses stereotyped representations, exemplified with his narratives of Catholicism, Islam, and Judaism, to motivate a particular evangelizing narrative and construction of a binary difference between the in-group and an Other.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011.
National Category
History of Religions
Research subject
Humanities, Study of Religions
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-38413OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-38413DiVA, id: diva2:767078
Conference
Stereotyping the Other. Exploring the Anatomy of Religious Prejudice - and Ways to Dismantle It, Lund, April 11, 2011
Available from: 2014-11-29 Created: 2014-11-29 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Presentation text

Authority records BETA

Lund, Martin

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lund, Martin
History of Religions

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 46 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf