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Inter-market variability in CO2 emission-intensities in tourism: Implications for destination marketing and carbon management
Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Lund Univ.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0505-9207
Univ Waterloo.
Univ Canterbury.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7734-4587
2015 (English)In: Tourism Management, ISSN 0261-5177, E-ISSN 1879-3193, Vol. 46, 203-212 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a growing gap between tourism's rapidly growing greenhouse gas emissions and the sector's 'aspirational' emission reduction targets as well as the international policy consensus to reduce emissions from this and all other sectors of the economy. The transport component is the largest GHG contributor to the global tourism system. In the absence of supranational policy agreements to curb emissions from international aviation and cruise tourism, as well as limited national policy initiatives, there has been a recent shift in research to the potential role of market-based carbon management for destinations to reduce emissions. Air travel is the most important subsector generating GHGs in international tourism. This article analyses the composition of international tourism markets arriving by air and their respective contribution to emissions at 11 selected countries with distinctly different tourism economies. The implications of changes in the market composition of these countries between 1995 and 2010 for average tourist carbon intensity and total emissions are examined. Results indicate variations in inter-market emission intensities of up to a factor 30 (127-3930 kg CO2/tourist) if comparing individual markets for the whole range of destinations, and up to a factor 5 (370-1830 kg CO2/tourist) if comparing average emission intensities between destinations. Findings are discussed with regard to the potential for destinations to reduce emissions from tourism by strategically fostering specific markets. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 46, 203-212 p.
Keyword [en]
Air travel, Carbon management, Climate change, Demarketing, Destination marketing, Destination management
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-38546DOI: 10.1016/j.tourman.2014.06.021ISI: 000344208600022OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-38546DiVA: diva2:769883
Available from: 2014-12-09 Created: 2014-12-09 Last updated: 2017-02-17Bibliographically approved

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Gössling, StefanHall, C. Michael
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf