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Dak’Art, the biennial exhibition of contemporary African art in Dakar: an exhibition charged with political issues
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences. (LNUC Concurrences in Colonial and Postcolonial Studies)
2012 (English)Conference paper, Presentation (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Dakar is situated at the western edge of Africa. It has been the site for a Lebou settlement, a centre for slave trade, and during colonial time capital of the French Western Africa. Since Senegal’s independence in 1960 Dakar has been its capital. Léopold Sédar Senghor was the first president. (Cooper, 2009:45.) As one of the founders of the Négritude movement, he placed the arts at the centre of his attempt to create a modern nationalist identity based on traditional West African values. Twenty-five percent of the state budget was directed to the Ministry of Culture for art schools, publishing houses, theatres, museums and art exhibition. Similar ideas were implemented in other newly independent African countries (Harney, 2004:49). In 1966 the first World Festival for Black Art and Culture was organised in Dakar, and in 1992 Dakar’s first international biennial art exhibition took place. Since the middle of the 1990’s Dak’Art has focused almost uniquely on African contemporary art. (Bydler 2004:274.)I have visited the Dak’art exhibitions in 2008 and 2010 and will go there again in beginning of May 2012. The exhibited works of art have been similar to Western contemporary art in terms of technique and multimodality. But the meanings of the selected works of art are often politically sharp and questioning historical and contemporary relations on a global level. (Dak’Art 2008, Dak’Art 2010.) At NORDIK2012 I would like to discuss how political issues have been communicated through artworks shown at Dak’Art 2008, 2010 and 2012, with interpretations from a postcolonial perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012.
Keyword [en]
Dak'Art, Contemporary art, African art, Political issues
National Category
Art History
Research subject
Humanities, Art science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-38637OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-38637DiVA: diva2:772427
Conference
Nordik 2012, Session "Fear of Art Museums: Staging Controversy", Stockholm, Sweden, October 24-27, 2012
Projects
Vetenskapsrådet, Concurrences –Narrating simultaneous and conflicting voices in post colonial time and space.
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2014-12-16 Created: 2014-12-16 Last updated: 2015-03-30Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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