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Impact of the residential environment on second home use in Finland - Testing the compensation hypothesis
Finnish Environm Inst SYKE, Helsinki, Finland.
Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Univ Canterbury, New Zealand ; Univ Oulu, Finland ; Univ Johannesburg, South Africa ; Univ Eastern Finland, Finland.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7734-4587
2015 (English)In: Landscape and Urban Planning, ISSN 0169-2046, E-ISSN 1872-6062, Vol. 133, 12-23 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Calls for densification of urban structure highlight questions of compensation: do residents in dense urban environment compensate for the relative lack of gardens, parks and outdoor leisure opportunities in their primary residential area by traveling to second homes or other leisure destinations? How should compensation be addressed in urban planning? In Finland the use of second homes is widespread and may be such a compensation mechanism. The compensation hypothesis has previously been explored in the context of second home ownership. This study examines compensation for the first time with respect to the actual use of second homes. Use is a more flexible variable and second home users are a larger and socio-economically more heterogeneous group than the owners. The quality of the permanent home's residential environment was assessed by four factors: building density, access to private garden, and accessibility of local and larger green areas. The impact of these residential environment variables on both second home use and ownership was analyzed by regression analysis in which the socio-economic and demographic factors were controlled. Statistical relationships were found between the residential area and second home use, which provides support for the compensation hypothesis. When building density increases or the access to a private garden is reduced, the use of second homes increases. However, accessibility to green areas does not explain use. Analysis reveals that second home use is a more valid indicator for compensation than ownership. None of the residential environment variables explain the ownership of second homes. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 133, 12-23 p.
Keyword [en]
Compensation hypothesis, Densification, Urban planning, Green infrastructure, Leisure mobility
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Economy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-39122DOI: 10.1016/j.landurbplan.2014.09.011ISI: 000346540600002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-39122DiVA: diva2:781003
Note

Correction: Strandell A, Hall CM. 2015. Impact of the residential environment on second home use in Finland - Testing the compensation hypothesis (vol 133, pg 12, 2015). Landscape and Urban Planning 137:165-167. DOI: 10.1016/j.landurbplan.2014.11.002

Available from: 2015-01-15 Created: 2015-01-15 Last updated: 2017-02-17Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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